Our Blog

13
Mar

(Why) Is China the Top Beneficiary of Globalization?

Frustrations surrounding an alleged “free ride” that certain countries have been getting as a result of globalization have been building up in the proverbial West for quite a while, with the year 2016 being perhaps a textbook example to that effect in light of two events which have both proven that a significant segment of

12
Mar

Gambling in China? Demand, Legislative Landscape and Solutions

Yes, gambling is illegal in China and technically speaking, any form of gambling has been outlawed since the Communist Party of China took over back in 1949. As such, at this point in time, anything from playing poker among friends with anything other than “make-pretend” money to gambling online is prohibited and punishable by law.

11
Mar

“Gamers” in China: The Remarkable Growth of China’s Online Gaming Sector

With an impressive $4.25 billion in gaming-related revenue projected for 2020 (a 0.8% YOY growth rate) and roughly 325 million gamers (a 2.1% YOY growth rate), it should come as no surprise that the stakes are remarkably high when it comes to China’s online gaming industry, in light of it representing the global leader in

10
Mar

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)… Industry?

In its journey toward (economic) world domination, China needs any edge it can get and in the eyes of the Beijing authorities, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) represents just that: something China-specific that can be used as an economic growth engine. For the sake of clarity, please note that this is not a medical article and

09
Mar

(Neo)Authoritarianism in China: The Past, Present and Future of Authoritarian Rule

Much can be said about China’s economic system, about socialism with Chinese characteristics and its many common denominators when comparing it to both capitalism and socialism. Some economists praise China for being more market-oriented than let’s say many European nations in some respects, others claim the exact opposite. Let’s just say that few things are

08
Mar

Discrimination in China: Systemic Issue, Granular Problem… or Both?

Here at ChinaFund.com, we have rather frequently presented studies and metrics (pertaining to freedom of speech, for example) which make it clear that China isn’t exactly the most politically correct nation in the world. While our team firmly believes that generation-defining investment opportunities lie ahead in China, we just as firmly believe in being straightforward

07
Mar

China’s (Booming) Vitamin and Dietary Supplements (VDS) Market

The Vitamin and Dietary Supplements market represents yet another example of a booming industry that China is poised to dominate, with Roland Berger data indicating the fact that the market is expected to find support north of $40 billion by 2023, boasting an impressive 14% CAGR. These figures should (of course, this is dependent on

06
Mar

(More or Less Misunderstood) Consumption Trends in China: Consumerism on Steroids?

Time and time again, observers find certain consumption trends in China downright peculiar. For example, why on Earth has there been such a surge in luxury spending and generally speaking, spending meant to impress the proverbial Chinese version of the Jones family in a country that used to be plagued by debilitating poverty a few

05
Mar

The Cultural “Westernization” of China: Hollywood, Pop Culture and Their Economic Effects

In a world tailor-made to the specifications of the Communist Party of China (in a let’s say ideal scenario from the perspective of the CPC), the population of China would reject any and all Western components, elements the Party considers detrimental to its very self-preservation interests. Unfortunately for the CPC, that’s not exactly how things

04
Mar

Pet Ownership in China: A Surprising Mega-Trend

Ask any elderly Chinese citizen to describe let’s say a “textbook” urban scene from back when he was young and ask an American to do the same. Among other differences, you will most likely notice that pets are absent from the description of the elderly Chinese. Contrary to popular belief, pets are anything but completely