Geopolitics

11
Jul

Looking at China Through a BRICS Lens

The initial term “BRIC” was coined by the chief economist of Goldman Sachs (Jim O’Neill) back in 2001 and referred to the world’s four most important emerging markets: Brazil, Russia, India and China. As of 2010, South Africa (the “S” dimension of BRICS) was added to the equation and right off the bat, it’s important

08
Jul

Could China Win a Trade War Against the United States?

In light of the (relatively) recent concerns surrounding the possibility of trade tensions between China and the United State escalating in a dramatic manner, a lot of observers are undoubtedly asking themselves whether or not a trade war can actually be won. So, could China win a trade war against the United States? Yes. Could

06
Jul

China – India Relations: From Common Economic Goals to Geostrategic Concerns

China, with its population that exceeds 1.4 billion and India, with a population that exceeds 1.3 billion and is getting close to the 1.4 billion milestone, represent the world’s #1 and #2 nations by population and at the same time, countries that have grown tremendously from a GDP perspective and are poised to maintain their

05
Jul

China and Taiwan: Economic Strength vs. Geopolitical Vulnerabilities

As an analyst, one cannot help but be prudent when describing the relationship between China and Taiwan… or, to be more precise, relationships (plural) because, frankly, it’s very difficult as well as sub-optimal to treat the Chinese-Taiwanese status quo in a uni-dimensional matter. The most straightforward approach, in this author’s view at least, is seeing

05
Jul

Is China Still an “Emerging” or “Developing” Country?

Whenever there is a lot of money involved, even aspects such as national pride become less important and the issue of whether or not China should be considered an “emerging” or “developing” country is perhaps a textbook example. Think of it as Asian “Realpolitik” or, in other words, China’s way of trying to get the

04
Jul

The Belt and Road Initiative in a Nutshell

Up until 2016, it was called the OBOR (One Belt One Road) Strategy, whereas nowadays, we refer to it as the BRI (Belt and Road Initiative). To avoid misunderstandings, the word “one” was eliminated from the equation and “strategy” was replaced by “initiative” to avoid making other geopolitical players suspicious. Regardless of the name we

04
Jul

China’s Leadership Role(s) in a Potentially Multi-Polar World

Whether we like/accept it or not, the world is moving toward a multi-polar leadership framework as opposed to the US-centric one we have today. Why? Simply because there are many forces pushing the world in such as direction rather than there just being one reason which explains everything, forces such as: The United States itself

04
Jul

Hu Jintao’s Conservative Balance-Oriented Leadership of China

Jiang Zemin left behind a China of contradictions in many respects. On the one hand, a nation that had experienced impressive economic growth but on the other hand, the frequently unsustainable nature of that economic growth came with its own set of problems, from externalities such as pollution to ideological inconsistencies (with many members of

03
Jul

Why You Should Care About the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO)

If you ask 10 relatively politico-economically literate individuals what NATO is, it is quite probable that 8 or 9 will know. Ask the same people what the SCO is and more likely than not, you’ll be on the receiving end of 10 shrugs. Yet despite its less than stellar notoriety outside diplomatic circles and despite

02
Jul

Deng Xiaoping and the Modernization(s) of China

As mentioned in our article about Mao Zedong, an attitude shift with respect to the proverbial West started taking place near Mao’s death but it was a fairly… well, let’s call it modest one. Not only was it modest, the reasons behind it were less related to the intention of embarking on a journey toward